The secrets of Spain’s most underrated city

Galleons laden with bullion, dyes such as cochineal and indigo, chocolate, Aztec sculptures that amazed Durer, arriving on the Guadalquivir River. Built on Roman and subsequent Islamic culture, it became a bustling centre for trade. Jewish communities, merchants from Antwerp — all were here. The streets are handsome, lined with orange trees, which in February are harvested by men in aprons that encircle the body. Up the ladder they go and huge numbers of oranges, bound for the English kitchen and marmalade jars, encircle their waist. You can buy a fino and eat tapas all evening, going from bar to bar. Marius Petipa, the Russian choreographer came here and leant the Sevillian dances. Indeed, there is more to the city than meets the eye.

Keiller’s marmalade

Mrs A Willis, Newcastle. Welsh Corgi Pembroke Graduate: Mrs S A Bailes, Whitby.

Dundee is the fourth-largest city in Scotland with a population of around , people. It is situated on the north bank of the Firth of Tay on the east coast of the Central Lowlands of Scotland. The Dundee area has been settled since the Mesolithic with evidence of Pictish habitation beginning in the Iron Age.

The trade supported 36 spinning mills by , but various conflicts, including the Crimean war put a stop to the trade. At around this time, jute , a common fibre from the Indian sub-continent , was looked at as a possible alternative but was difficult to handle. It was discovered that treatment with whale oil , a byproduct of Dundee’s whaling industry, made the spinning of the jute fibre possible, which led to the development of a substantial jute industry in the city.

This growth precipitated a large increase in population. By the end of the 19th century the majority of Dundee’s working population were employed in jute manufacture, but the industry began to decline in , when it became cheaper to rely on imports of the finished product from India. Dundee’s ‘jute barons’ had invested heavily in Indian factories. In , the Ashton Works were requisitioned by the Government and taken over by “Briggs Motor Bodies Ltd” for the production of jerrycans. Ten million were produced by the time of derequisition in

A History: ’s Word of the Year

It is an opportunity for us to reflect on the language and ideas that represented each year. So, take a stroll down memory lane to remember all of our past Word of the Year selections. Change It wasn’t trendy , funny, nor was it coined on Twitter , but we thought change told a real story about how our users defined Unlike in , change was no longer a campaign slogan.

Jar Opener Vintage Style-Decorating With Demijohns this morning 11 Favorites: The Classic Larder Vintage jars in a glass carrier~cool I’m crushin’ on these Vintage “Dundee” marmalade jars. My great-grandma was born in Dundee, Scotland. From Wikipedia: “The Scottish city of Dundee has a long association with marmalade.

We visited a pick your own farm where the hedges of Sea buckthorn were plenty and laden with fruit. Sea Buckthorn grows in coastal areas in Europe and Asia, in dunes and on moors. Their roughness reflects the landscape in which they thrive. Brisk winds and cold, draught, desolate plains. Their root system is invasive, but improves marginal soil. In some areas the bushes have even been used for soil erosion control and land reclamation projects.

It sort off feels like their thorns tell us to let them be, so that they can do good for the surrounding earth, the wildlife and to bring a highly healthy berry to the people that live around them. Birds can nest in the branches, benefiting from the piercing thorns as protection agains predators. The oval berries are tart, bitter and have little sweetness to them. They have been used for medicinal purposes for centuries, they are full of anti-oxidants, beta-carotene, vitamine C, A and E and they battle inflammation.

A concentrated puree from the berries can be used to relief sunburn and some say it could be good for some skin conditions. You could call them a super food, but lets forget about that horrible hipster term shall we? The young leaves can be used for tea because of their amino-acids, fatty acids, minerals and ability to boosting the immune system. An oil is made from the berries and seeds and used for all kinds of ails.

A History: ’s Word of the Year

Quince drawing by Toki Oshima By Roberta Bailey Dating back over years and originating in Persia and Anatolia, quince was once the most popular fruit grown. In the Middle Ages, quince were so highly esteemed in France that a quince preserve or marmalade called contignac was the gift to visiting royalty. When Joan of Arc arrived to lift the siege of Orleans, the first gift offered her was contignac.

Jar Packaging, Dundee, Marmalade, Little Houses, s, James D’arcy, Jars, Tiny Houses, Small Houses Find this Pin and more on Jar Packaging by Hearth & Larder. See more.

Share this article Share My father, however, never spoke of his ancestors. Besides, we visited his parents – my grandparents – often at their home in Esher in Surrey. I knew very little about them, other than that they were Scottish, had once been wealthy and that their house was almost like a shrine to Scotland, even though both had been born and lived their long lives entirely in England.

There was some mystery in this: But I could not imagine the extent of the revelations to be uncovered by the programme’s researchers that would reveal why. We filmed my episode either side of Easter. It was the first filming I’d done in 20 years of television where I was not controlling the content nor speaking directly to the camera, and I found this extremely strange for the first few days.

We started at the house of my older brother, David. He still lives in the village in which we were raised and has dozens of documents, photos and certificates which helped me on my first step of the journey. L to R Monty’s great grandmother, Charlotte, her father, Rev Charles Hodge, and great grandfather William Keiller With these papers alone I was able to go back years to my great-great grandparents or, more precisely, my mother’s grandmother’s parents, the Hodges.

The secrets of Spain’s most underrated city

It arrives in January – the only time of year when the bitter Seville oranges are available – and disappears by about February, spread liberally on as much toast as my household can consume. Besides my own mum, help of another kind is on hand in the form of Marmalade: And according to Randell, our love of marmalade dates back to the 18th century, when it was first made commercially by the Keiller family in Scotland.

Mrs Keiller set about making them into marmalade and Mr Keiller sold it. Around the same time, home cooks were beginning to experiment with recipes for marmalade-type preserves.

Marmalade has since become the preserve of larger businesses, but jars of Keiller’s marmalade are still widely available. “Journalism” refers to the publishing firm DC Thomson & Co., which was founded in the city in and remains the largest employer after the health and leisure industries.

Dundee is Scotland’s only south-facing city, giving it a claim to being Scotland’s sunniest and warmest city. Temperatures tend to be a couple of degrees higher than Aberdeen to the north or the coastal areas of Angus. Dundee suffers less severe winters than other parts of Scotland due to the close proximity to the North sea and the salt air and a range of protective hills at the back of the city, which are often snow covered while the city itself remains clear.

The city, being on a relatively small landspace, is the most densely populated area in Scotland after Glasgow and around fifth in the U. It is characterised by tall tenements, mainly four storeys high, Victorian , and built from a honey or brown sandstone. The inner districts of the city, as well as some of the outer estates, are home to a large number of multi storey tower blocks from the s. The outer estates are among some of the poorest urban districts in the United Kingdom.

To the east of the city area is the distinct but incorporated suburb of Broughty Ferry with its yacht club, wide ranging and upmarket services and expensive houses—many of architectural note, developed during the Industrial Revolution , housing professionals, footballers, and the GMTV presenter Lorraine Kelly. Two of Scotland’s most prestigious links golf courses, St Andrews and Carnoustie are located nearby.

Marmalade: A sunny start for every morning

Add the flour and the salt and pulse until just combined. In a separate bowl, whisk together the egg yolk and cream, then add it to the flour mixture and pulse a few times. Wrap the dough in plastic wrap and refrigerate for 20 minutes.

Oct 30, – Rent Bed and breakfasts in Dundee, United Kingdom from $20/night. Find unique places to stay with local hosts in countries. Belong anywhere with Airbnb.

The trade supported 36 spinning mills by , but various conflicts, including the Crimean war put a stop to the trade. At around this time, jute , a common fibre from the Indian sub-continent , was looked at as a possible alternative but was difficult to handle. It was discovered that treatment with whale oil , a byproduct of Dundee’s whaling industry, made the spinning of the jute fibre possible, which led to the development of a substantial jute industry in the city.

This growth precipitated a large increase in population. By the end of the 19th century the majority of Dundee’s working population were employed in jute manufacture, but the industry began to decline in , when it became cheaper to rely on imports of the finished product from India. Dundee’s ‘jute barons’ had invested heavily in Indian factories. In , the Ashton Works were requisitioned by the Government and taken over by “Briggs Motor Bodies Ltd” for the production of jerrycans.

Ten million were produced by the time of derequisition in The Cragie works closed for economic reasons at the end of when a study found that it was not viable to modernised equipment; production was subsequently moved to Ashton works. Commercial jute production in Dundee ceased in the s, particularly after the cessation of jute control on April 30, The last of the jute spinners closed in From a peak of over mills, many have since been demolished, although around sixty have been redeveloped for residential or other commercial use.

Food & Social history

Jams, jellies, preserves, and marmalades are an important part of American family history and, though they have surely been around for eons, in this country come from when Americans were agricultural. But first, to answer your question: Fruit cooked with an equivalent amount of sugar and a little bit of water until a drop of the hot juice dripped onto the back of a cold metal spoon coagulates is the basis of what every American puts on his or her toast.

If the juice has been strained from the fruit, and only the jelled fruit juice is included, it’s jelly. If the fruit pulp is included with the jelled juice, it’s jam. If the fruit is in chunks or is whole think strawberries , it’s preserves.

“Marmalade is part of our British culinary psyche, it represents us on breakfast tables all over the world and is something we are, justifiably, very proud of,” she says.

It arrives in January – the only time of year when the bitter Seville oranges are available – and disappears by about February, spread liberally on as much toast as my household can consume. Besides my own mum, help of another kind is on hand in the form of Marmalade: And according to Randell, our love of marmalade dates back to the 18th century, when it was first made commercially by the Keiller family in Scotland.

Mrs Keiller set about making them into marmalade and Mr Keiller sold it. Around the same time, home cooks were beginning to experiment with recipes for marmalade-type preserves. I was fascinated by the range and variety sent in from around the world, hundreds and hundreds of jars and every one was different.

Dalemain Marmalade Jars YouTube


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